She’s Still Got It

By Erika Harrington

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As a soon-to-be college graduate, getting ready to enter the workforce, I’ve got a bone to pick with baby boomers today that refuse to leave the workforce. You’ve had your fun, and now it’s my turn to know the joy of a steady paycheck, saved capital, and credit. And apparently you all are working longer because every generation gets healthier and healthier and live longer lives. Which is cool and all, but come on–can’t you enjoy your health in retirement?

Okay, okay. I know you don’t deserve all the blame. The economy and personal debt crises are making it difficult for you to leave the workforce even if you wanted to. We can all agree, regardless of age, that that is lame.

Now that I’m done with my typical “millennial whining,” I will say that I’m loving the new trend of unprecedentedly older women remaining in the workforce much longer than their predecessors. It’s a true sign of progress to see women, who in past generations would have been weeded out of their jobs because of domestic pressures, experiencing fulfillment at later stages of their career. This also adds an exciting new question to the conversation surrounding professional females: what is it like to be an older woman in the workforce?

Researchers Carol Atkinson, Jackie Ford, and Nancy Harding recognized the need to investigate this new demographic of professionals. They interviewed 51 year old HR Director, Flora, to ask about the rewards and obstacles of working in this stage of life. Let’s take a look at some of the aspects of her experiences.

For one, there’s mentoring. Flora explained that entering this stage comes with a great deal of uncertainty. She can’t look to older women in her life like her mother or friends, because she doesn’t know many women who worked this late into their life at all. That’s tough. Being a female in the workforce is hard enough at the start, but if women don’t feel like they have any mentors to look to for help in continuing their career throughout later parts of their life, they might not be motivated to keep at it. And a cycle continues–a cycle that limits the shelf life of our careers.

Then comes a crossover between ageism and sexism. The researchers also discussed the new environment that’ll be undoubtedly formed in the professional world as the number of older women working increased. This environment includes the overlap between sexism and ageism that older women would inevitably have to face. Flora, like many women, also took a break to tend to her family. Coming back with gaps in her career is an obstacle unique to older women.

The cringe-worthy questions have switched from “Do you plan on having kids? How are you going to balance that with this job?” to “Are you sure you didn’t fall behind during the time you took off for your kids?”

Tsourcehe beautiful thing is that women in their 50s and 60s are paving a new way that female professionals in the past have not. They’re dodging the loaded speech and breaking stereotypes so that maybe, just maybe, the next wave of ladies won’t have to.

So as a millennial about to enter the workforce, who is lucky to have so many women with 20+ years of experience in their fields, I would like to not only apologize from my sassiness earlier, but also thank you for being an example to look up to when I plan out my long term professional goals. Not only do you show me that I don’t have to cut my career short for any reason, but you show me what bravery looks like in a world of uncertainty.

Never quit makin’ that money.

 

Fake People, Real Love.

By Erika Harrington

Teamwork makes the dreamwork and two is always better than one, right? Well yeah, kinda. And maybe not if you’re the type of person that gives all the credit for a job well done to your partner. The success of the group should mean success for all parties—and should is the key word here.

We’ve seen the research that suggests that women have trouble with self promotion, and tend to shy away from boasting about themselves. The problem reaches a different level when women start to give all the credit to their partner after a successful collaboration.

You know the moment when your boss asks, “How much do you think you contributed to the success of this project?” Please tell me you didn’t answer “oh it was all them.” Because we both know that’s not true.

Researchers Michelle Haynes and Madison Heilman found that women give their credit away more often than you might think. They set up an experiment in which participants worked on a project and were told that they and a partner working from a separate locationa partner they would never have any contact withwould have to complete individual tasks remotely. Their separate contributions would be compiled for the final product. The catch: the partner is completely made up.

Did you pick up on that? A partner, that only exist in the land of make believe, is supposedly helping these participants with their assignments when the reality is that no one is contributing but them.

This is where it gets really wild. When some participants were told that they had done good work, the researchers asked who they thought deserved the credit. And they said their partner. Their partner. Their completely not real, totally made-up partner who totally did not deserve credit for their totally fake help on the project.

drake-rips-jay-z-raptors-netsFake people, man.

I was speechless when I learned this. I couldn’t believe it. How could these women attribute all their greatness to some pretend person?

Okay, now let’s take a step back. Not all of the participants gave away their credit to Casper the Friendly Ghost™ and the Easter Bunny™. The male participants did a good job of talking about their contributions.

And this is a trend we know holds true for many, real professional women. We have trouble taking credit for our own success and we struggle to promote the skills that our employers have benefited from. It’s also worth mentioning that when the participants of this study were told that their remote partner was female, they tended to take more credit for their work. They simply gave into misconceptions about male superiority.

The solution here is so simple; own it like the queens of RuPaul’s drag race. giphy

The reason why you are constantly creating quality work and seeing projects you’re a part of achieve success isn’t because of everyone around you. And it’s definitely not because you’re fortunate enough to have male coworkers. It’s because of you! And it’s high time that you start making sure people know that.

Undoing Gender at Work

By Joey Konrad

Picture this:

You are a trained physician on a flight to Hawaii. A flight attendant announces over the intercom that a passenger has become unresponsive and a doctor is needed immediately. You rush out of your seat and run to notify the attendant that you can help. However, the attendant simply brushes you off and refuses to believe you are, in fact, a doctor.

The enormous amount of money and time spent at medical school and residency to finally reach the status of a practicing physician, and all of it washed away by a simple refusal to trust your words.

This situation is not a nightmare or work of fiction, but a personal account of events that actually unfolded.

If that’s not wild enough, this is not an isolated event. In 2009, Elisabeth Kelan conducted interviews with working men and women at technology firms. She found that women reported frequently struggling to be accepted by customers as technology workers. Eerily similar to the earlier story, one women had a customer refuse to believe she was an executive and lead programmer. They had the nerve to refer to her as a secretary during meetings and told her to take notes.

The interviews suggest that our thoughts about gender inform our thoughts about who is suited for different work.

Let’s look at some statistics that back up that statement.

The prevailing idea in American culture is that individuals are free to pursue whatever passion or line of work they choose. However, the workforce remains significantly gender segregated.

The U.S. Department of Labor occupational statistics reveal that women dominate caretaker fields; 96 percent of secretaries, 95 percent of childcare workers, and 91 percent of registered nurses are women. Meanwhile, women make up only 14 percent of engineers, 9 percent of construction workers, and 6 percent of programmers.200

And we’re supposed to believe this is just a coincidence?

What if we look at the earlier examples to account for cultural bias and assumptions?

The customer can refuse to believe the woman was an executive programmer if information technology is considered  “masculine” work. Furthermore, the customer assuming the woman was a secretary shows cultural assumptions that tell us what work is feminine.

Kelan noted that all the women interviewed described struggles with not being perceived as competent and legitimate in their workplace. Since programming is assumed to be masculine work, women’s ideas and skills are often ignored, so women face pressure and anxiety to legitimize themselves in the eyes of customers and co-workers.

So let’s talk about where we go from here.

Well first, we want to give a shout out to all women working in male-dominated fields. Any frustrations you feel about being taken seriously in your workplace are absolutely important. Your work blurs the lines between what is “feminine” and “masculine” work, and shows that people should be able to follow passions that inspire them.

But in case our encouragement isn’t enough – and it most likely won’t be – Elisabeth Kelan found that some women used business cards as a strategy for establishing legitimacy. Presenting cards early at meetings and interviews allows professional women to define themselves instead of customer’s assumptions.

You go girl!

Who you know or how you do?

By Rachel Garretson

The Gilmore Girls revival is out! But I promise, no spoilers if you haven’t seen it yet.

We’ve learned so much from this show: family, friendship, and of course…..work.

For example, watching  Rory use her network to get that meeting. Like so many of us, Rory is very independent. While we really admire her if-I-just-work-hard-I-will-make-it attitude, depending solely on hard work is a mistake many women make in the beginning featured-imageof their careers.

But you can’t just rely on hard work- sometimes we think that reaching out to others to get ahead is cheating, but it’s not. This is because there are good people out there who want to help you. What’s more, they’re probably going to need you back at some point too.

Also, it’s not just who’s in your network that matters. How you network is important, and research suggests men and women do this differently. Case in point: Yvonne Benschop studied the how of networking by interviewing 20 female and 19 male account managers about their networking practices. She found that there are four types of networkers:

The first is the aspirational networker who views networking relationships as a means to the end. They often value assertiveness, authority, and upward mobility. Their networks consist mainly of people in the higher echelons and they call upon them when they need to get something done.

The second type is the supportive networker, someone who views the relationship as the goal. They might stop by someone’s desk and catch up or take personal time to call and see how they’re doing. Even when they have something urgent to get done, they think of others and pay attention to their needs.

These types follow the traditional ideas of masculinity and femininity. They aren’t necessarily separate, and many of us blend the two, although Benchop found that women are indeed more likely to embrace the latter. However, we can see how solely supportive networking won’t get you as far, since you’re placing others above yourself.

These next two types deal with the degree of separation you put between work and personal life.

Instrumental networkers draw strict lines between work life and professional life. That’s not to say that an instrumental networker won’t have friendly relationships with their coworkers (after all, you’ll be more productive if you get along) but they will be clear that it is a business relationship. Unfortunately this may make you feel alone in your workplace.

Open networkers blur the line between work and personal networks. To them it’s all one big network. Sure, work is work, but open networkers are more….well, open about their personal lives, and consequently form more genuine and personal relationships at work.

dwp-insertOpen networking sounds great right? Best of both worlds! You’re upwardly mobile and get to have friends! But… women tend to be instrumental. So what’s up with women? Are they just your stereotypical type A, Miranda Priestly?

 No!

Why? We often assume a level of professionalism about men that we don’t extend to women. Consequently to emphasize their professionalism, women sometimes place strict boundaries between work and play

It seems to us that the best is a blend between aspirational and supportive and a tendency towards open. We women face enough in the workplace without having friends by our side. We want you to have the Lorelai-Sookie relationship you all deserve.

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Ladies: Modesty is Not the Best Policy

By Rebekah Peterson

Ladies, have you ever been told you did a great job and your gut reaction is to say:

“It was no big deal.”

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“It was just a little hard work.”

“I got some help along the way.”

Or, “I just got lucky”?

These are just a few examples of the ways women keep themselves from self-promoting, which is when you clearly articulate your strengths and accomplishments to a person to advance your professional career.

But why do women downplay their accomplishments?

In short, violating modesty norms (the expectation that women should be humble and modest and not talk about their own strengths) makes women uncomfortable. And research shows that women need to (and can) power through this discomfort if they want to be successful at work.

In 2013, researchers Smith and Huntoon randomly selected 78 women from a Northwestern university to write an essay for a scholarship application that promotes the merits of either themselves (breaking modesty norms) or another person as a letter of recommendation (not breaking modesty norms).

The researchers thought breaking the modesty norm would cause self-promoting women anxiety and in turn affect their ability to self-promote in their essays.

Turns out they were right.

When they asked the women about the experience of writing, the self-promoting women expressed less interest in the task, were more likely to adopt performance-avoiding goals (“I just wanted to avoid doing poorly on the task”), and felt they performed poorly.

But it wasn’t just the women themselves who judged their work poorly. The researchers took all the essays and had 44 new impartial research participants judge them. The catch was, the researchers reformatted the essays that were written about another person to sound like people were writing about themselves.  This way the judges couldn’t tell the difference between essays that were written to self-promote, and those that were originally written to promote others.  Result: the participants assessed the self-promoting essays as lower quality compared to those that originally promoted another person.

So, women couldn’t promote themselves as effectively due to their anxiety, but could effectively promote for another person.

Here’s where it gets crazy:

There was actually a second group of women who completed the same task, but they were told there was a black box in the room that generated subliminal noise and could cause them discomfort. In reality, the box was a fake and there was no subliminal noise.

But, the women who self-promoted with the supposed “subliminal noise” expressed more interest, adapted more performance-approach goals (“I wanted to do better than other students”), and felt their work was of higher quality.

So, it’s not that woman don’t have the ability to self-promote, they just need something to blame their anxiety about self-promoting on.

Does this mean all women should turn on a subliminal noise when they need to self-promote?

Of course not, but here are some tips:

  • Employers should recognize that women are downplaying themselves and work to encourage women to self-promote.
  • Women should recognize this makes them uncomfortable and practice talking about their own accomplishments so they can power through any anxiety.
  • Most importantly, women should support other women who self-promote and break modesty norms. Make a pact with your friends to call each other out when you’re downplaying and congratulate when you successfully self-promote.

So remember, next time you’re doubting yourself–you didn’t get lucky. You killed it.

The Leadership Double Duty: Being woman, becoming CEO

By Rebekah Peterson

Beyoncé knows “who run the world? Girls!”

Well, if Beyoncé declared it, then why hasn’t the business world caught on yet?

Only 14.2% of the top leadership positions at the companies in the S&P 500 are held by women.

What’s worse? Out of those 500 companies, there are only 24 female CEOs.

The good news? Companies that sustain a high representation of women board members significantly outperform companies with few or no women board members, according to a 2011 Catalyst analysis.

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Point: Having women in leadership pays off. Literally.

In fact, there is research that proves women’s leadership is more effective than men’s. In a 2003 analysis of existing research, van Engen, Eagly, and Johannesen-Schmidt found that transformational leadership is the most effective for managing. This type of leadership inspires employees to go beyond the call of duty, foster creative solutions, serve as mentors, and articulate plans for achieving a vision. As shown in the analyses, women exceed men on overall transformational leadership, which leads to more effective styles.

In 2011 those same researchers teamed up with Claartje Vinkenburg to analyze questionnaire responses from 271 men and women participants who had considerable management experience and assessed their beliefs about leadership. They found that people perceive women as having effective leadership.

AKA, women demonstrate effective leadership, get stuff done, and people know it. So, why aren’t they reaching the highest level of management?

Well, in the second part of Vinkenburg et al’s study, they analyzed questionnaire results from 514 men and women participants who had considerable management experience to assess how they believe men or women should lead. They found “inspirational motivation” style, which is when one rallies optimism and excitement about goals or future states, was deemed a less important “should” for women.

Here is where the damage is done: While we don’t look to women for inspirational motivation,  Inspirational motivation is most correlated with promotions to senior level management, especially CEO.

Tricky how that works. Right?

Inspirational motivation was perceived as the most important for a male manager to receive a promotion to senior management. So, if a male manager is seeking a higher level promotion he should adopt this style to increase his chance.

…Women have to do double duty:

The research suggests that women managers who want higher level promotions must combine inspiration motivation and a style called “individualized consideration”—a leadership style that emphasizes developing and mentoring followers and attending to individual needs.

Why?

Women must show their leadership style is congruent with senior level management (AKA inspirational), but must also use individualized consideration because this is congruent with female gender roles as caretakers. In other words, women must combine leadership styles that correlate with the most common white male CEO, but also display leadership style that fits the stereotype of female roles to mitigate backlash.

Although reaching the top is not easy for anyone, or fair for women, knowing what leadership styles to combine can help get you that promotion. Be your team and employee’s motivator, while also reaching out as a mentor to them.whorunthe

Now get out there and prove Beyoncé right.

We can run the world… Next stop: CEO

Attention Ladies: Male Mentoring Matters

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By Ollie Field

I don’t think it matters how old you are, Legally Blonde is a source of inspiration and female empowerment for generations of women. Elle Woods fearlessly broke through the glass ceiling (an invisible barrier hindering women’s success) from her sorority house to Harvard Law School because, “What? Like it’s hard?” and demonstrated that women can be both feminine and successful. Woods did encounter obstacles, however, such as that creep of a mentor, Professor Callahan.

Speaking of mentors….

Kelli Holmes’s 2013 review of scholarly research defines a mentor as a “high ranking, influential senior organizational member with advanced experience and knowledge, committed to providing upward mobility and support to a protégée’s professional career.” One of the conclusions of her review is that a lack of mentors for women directly contributes to glass ceiling.

Why is there a lack of mentors? Well, Holmes cites a number of reasons.

First, let’s start with the numbers. 2.2% of Fortune-500 CEOs and 1 in 5 senior managers are women. That puts a lot of pressure on just a few women to mentor all of us up-and-coming stars.

But why should the pressure be on those few women? Holmes’ research indicates that mentors choose their protégées based on how they personally identify with them – male CEOs and managers are more likely to have common interests with younger male employees. (It’s called the principle of homophily, we’ve talked about it before.)

To make matters worse, the research also showed that some male mentors are afraid of forming a close relationship with a female protégée, because it could be mistaken as sexual rather than professional. Likewise, female employees are hesitant to seek out male mentors for fear of the same sexual misunderstanding. Apparently, Elle’s touchy experience with Professor Callahan isn’t just a thing for the movies.

Despite the difficulty of finding a mentor, it is so worth it. Holmes found that mentors take on two very important functions; they provide career guidance, such as sponsorship and coaching, and provide psychological support by being there as a counselor and friend.

In fact, Forret and Dougherty conducted a survey study in 2004 and found a positive correlation between having a mentor, compensation, and rate of promotion. This was especially true among women with male mentors compared to males with male mentors and females with female mentors.

…Is this saying that you should only go find yourself a male mentor to be successful? Of course not. Instead, it emphasizes the number of men in high-level positions, with more professional influence and a greater tendency to take on a mentor role.

So for you ladies in power positions:

Whether you’re a CEO or simply a member of a local club, know that your power and authority comes with responsibility. Remember that other women are looking for guidance, and even if it isn’t apparent, they see you as a leader. Offer your words of wisdom or go as far as to offer yourself as a mentor.

And for those of you who need some guidance in your life… Follow these three steps suggested by Forbes to find a mentor:

  1. Ask yourself what you want in a mentor.
  2. Check out your employer’s human resources department to see if they have a mentorship program.
  3. Look outside of the office, too. A mentor doesn’t have to be limited to a “business” relationship.

And finally, don’t forget what Elle said…

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Talk Like Me

By Rachel Garretson

You know all those self-help books proclaiming revolutionary, catch-all formulas for success in this male dominated business world? Right after that chapter that tells you how you should stand and sit, they always tell you to learn their language.

Well…. Not to give those self-help books too much credit, but there is some scientific evidence supporting this although it’s not so straightforward. It turns out that there are different styles of language but while it’s true that many women grow up learning a more tentative style of speech, not all women do!

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Powerless speech (typically thought of as female) is characterized by things like hesitations (“well,” “like” or “um”), tag questions (“right?” or “don’t you think?”), and disclaimers (I’m not sure, but…”). Powerful speech does not include these characteristics.

Of course, rules are made to be broken! Many men use powerless language, just as many women use powerful speech. I mean come on; do you think Daenerys’s language could ever be considered tentative?

Even so, many studies like this one by Rob Thomson, Tamar Murachver, and James Green demonstrate that in addition to gender, things like situation influence the speech pattern you take. They learned this by having participants talk online with a “friend” (experimenters) who used either powerful or powerless speech styles. They found that participants often adapted their speech styles to mimic the one being used by their friend. The speech styles of those around you, power dynamics within a group, and even the topic of your conversation can influence the speech styles you adopt!

Unfortunately, in our individualistic society, which values standing out, powerful language is touted as the best and those self-help books we mentioned are constantly telling women they need to use powerful language or they won’t get ahead. This is not the always the case!

Each style has benefits. Alison Fragale had participants complete tasks online with a “partner” (really a scripted computer program) then they were asked to make judgments and confer status to their partner. In groups that didn’t need to cooperate as much, individuals with powerful speech were indeed considered more competent and intelligent. In groups where cooperation was key, however, this pattern reverses! Powerless speech, which emphasizes relationship building and consensus, was considered the better speech pattern!

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Thus neither style is more appropriate for a certain gender or even better over all, merely better in certain situations. We don’t need to avoid powerless speech, we need to become more aware of which style we’re using and which would be best in this situation.

Guess your mom was right after all when she always told you to think about what you say before you say it!

Balancing Bias

By Jennifer PeeksMease

Is the challenge of balance a hill only women climb?

usatsi_9431971_168381878_lowresFact: tune into any gymnastics competition, and you’ll only find women flipping, turning, and twisting on a strip of wood just 4 inches wide.

Whether you’re on a beam, or at work, it seems the ability to balance is a necessary virtue for any woman who wants to bring home the dough. 

But as we’re sure you, your besties, and Simone and Laurie have clearly demonstrated: women ARE master balancers. We will find a way to get to that charity event, console our friend going through a terrible breakup, hit the gym, read a book (to our kids if we have them), do the laundry, feed the mouths that need to eat, and still find time to make sure our family knows they are loved.

The moral of the story—we’ve got this.  

But I’m afraid there’s more to it than that.  

While you may think you have this work life balance thing down, your boss may not…and that can spell trouble for you.

Jenny Hoobler, Sandy Wayne, and Grace Lemmon of the University of Illinois at Chicago conducted a survey of employees and their bosses to assess perceptions of work/life conflict and its effect on promotability.  

As it turns out, women employees actually reported less work life conflict than men who were surveyed, but that didn’t change the fact the bosses were more likely to perceive women employees as having greater work life conflict.  

More importantly, this perception of women’s work life conflict impacted boss’s perception of female employee’s “fit” with the organization and promotable roles, two factors they found to be most important to a boss’s perception of promotability.  (Yep, these two things mattered even more than their perceptions of an employee’s performance.)

Let me recap this for you: If your boss perceives you to have work life conflict, they are less likely to see you as “fit” for promotion.  And, bummer for you ladies, they are more likely to perceive women as having this work life conflict.

But what good does it do us to know this?

First, if you’re a person in the position to promote, check yourself! (And we mean all of you, the sex of bosses in this study didn’t significantly change this bias.)  Don’t let even casual conversations about an employee’s “fit” for a promotion digress into speculation about her obligations outside of work.  

And while we hate to put the burden on women to navigate yet one more hurdle, we encourage you to monitor how you talk about your obligations outside of work.  

Show your love for your family by talking about how wonderfully supportive they are of your career, and how much they help you out at home. (Oh, and don’t waste your time on a partner who isn’t worth bragging about in the first place…but that’s another blog post.)

Finally, make sure you’re managing your relationship with your superiors to position yourself well for promotion, to….balance out….this bias.

Not sure what you can do? Check out some of our other posts on promotion, networking, mentoring, and self-promotion.

Say Her Name, Say Her Name

By Liv Stephens

It’s time to talk about a little bit of Monica, Erica, Rita, Tina, Sandra, Mary, and Jessica.

anigif_enhanced-28999-1428709735-5Lou Bega was definitely not afraid of name dropping when he wrote the jive pop 1999 classic Mambo No. 5.  However, the song has us vibing for more than one reason; it promotes female autonomy!

No, it’s not a trap. You see, research suggests that male and masculine voices address women using language that identifies women through their relationships with other people. It is almost never done with malicious intent, and research basically chalks it up to a style of speech that men learn by talking with other men called “attachment erasure”and it looks kinda like this:

“This is so-and-so, she’s that one dude’s __________ [girlfriend/roommate/sister/cousin/ hookup/friend/classmate/dog groomer]”

Or this:

“Oh, I know you! You work for/with ______ [the name of your sweaty co-worker] ”

You may not have even noticed it before, but everyone does it to everyone.  It’s hard to not fall into this language pattern.  The problem is that references to women are much more likely to use attachment erasure than references to men. This means that womens’ networking looks and sounds a lot different than mens’.

Here’s the deal: generally speaking, we prefer to network with people who we like.  And research indicates that we like people more when we perceive them to be similar to us.  It’s called the principle of homophily.

Here’s why that matters: A 2006 study conducted by Vasilyeva and Doerfel interviewed and surveyed employees of a retail company to study differences in the ways that guys, gals, and androgynous pals communicate. Among the tsunami of relevant findings they uncovered, they found that women need a higher degree of homophily (aka social sameness) than men do when networking with men in their field. As in, women need to be seen as similar to the man they are talking to in order for social attachments to form.  Unfortunately, this “one of the guys” feel is confirmed through statements of attachment erasure.  

Men, on the other hand, do not need need to establish similarity through others to affirm their attachments in the workplace, and can instead assert their sameness through personal characteristics such as similar goals, activities, or achievements.

A 2016 article by Susan Durbin explains that mentor relationships that involved at least one woman were only reported to form between those who already had common social connections, often initiated through a statement of attachment erasure.

This might look like:

“Oh, you’re Linda’s cousin!”

“Hey, did you work for Tom over at Company Inc.?”

Men, on the other hand, were able to create mentoring relationships via activities and hobbies both internal and external to the workplace.

That might look like:

“Hey, did you also go to Expensive University?”

“Were you the guy who gave that presentation at that conference last week?”

You get the picture.

So, what does this mean for women? Women must focus especially on their social credentials, and not their personal credentials, to boost their networking abilities. The semi-unfortunate truth is that who they know may be more important than what they know. In order to regain their autonomy, women must establish personal similarities (or what the research calls attachments) instead of social attachments through other people.

We can all help close this attachment gap by referring to people of all genders using their personal characteristics, instead of their social connections.
Bega said it best: you “must stay deep, ‘cuz talk is cheap.”

If you enjoyed this article, feel free to comment. We love to hear what you have to say, and as always, thanks for reading The InformHer.